Monty - Sportive Cyclist
Monty is an enthusiastic road cyclist with only moderate talent. He started Sportive Cyclist in 2013 to record the journey to his first 100 mile ride, the RideLondon 100. Over time the blog has expanded to include training advice, gear reviews and road cycling tales, all from the perspective of a not-very-fit MAMIL. Since you're here, Monty would also like you to check out his YouTube channel and subscribe to receive email updates. Also, Monty really needs to stop referring to himself in the third person.

How To Fit A Bontrager Duotrap Speed and Cadence Sensor

How to fit a Bontrager Duotrap

So this is a nice specific post then. If you are looking for a bit of intel on how to fit a Bontrager Duotrap Speed and Cadence sensor to a Trek road bike (OMG – THERE’S A HOLE IN THE CHAINSTAY), then you’ve come to the right place. Okay, you’ve come to a place. Okay, you’re here.

On the other hand, if you’ve come for some general road cycling entertainment, then these are not the droids you’re looking for, Move along now.

So, for the roughly 0.1% of you that own a Trek bike with a hole in one of the chain stays, here’s a guide to installing a Duotrap speed and cadence sensor. Two things: (i) it’s very easy; (ii) I took loads of photos.

And now an additional THIRD thing as I update this post. I madez a video. It is, after all, 2020, and we are stuck in our houses. So, either watch this YouTube dispatch, or continue to read and look at the pictures, your choice.

Yes, you are welcome for all the value I am giving you.

Read moreHow To Fit A Bontrager Duotrap Speed and Cadence Sensor

Rouleur Classic 2019: My Review (With A Video!)

Rouleur Classic 2019 London

The Rouleur Classic is a bike show for hipsters. Based in London for two and a half days only, it is a celebration of bike-based beauty, cutting edge velo tech. And, from what I can tell, drinking.

Now, in terms of fashion, I’m firmly at the back of the peloton, if not the lanterne rouge. Nonetheless it seems that Rouleur lets anyone buy a ticket to attend. So i did. And I did.

And in this post (and video) I’m going to tell you about the cool stuff I saw at the show.

Read moreRouleur Classic 2019: My Review (With A Video!)

Garmin Edge 1030 vs Edge 830: A Comparison (Which Is Right For You?)

Garmin Edge 830 vs Edge 1030

The purpose of this post is to (wait for it…) compare the Garmin Edge 1030 with the Edge 830 so you can work out which is best bike GPS choice for you.

(Essentially, is it worth you paying a bit more in order to get the extra 200?)

So we’ll be looking at (and comparing) things like size, weight, the screen, buttons (buttons!), as well as the software features, both basic and sophisticated, so you can decide which bests suits your road cycling needs (whether that’s your actual ones or your perceived, I’m-on-the-verge-of-turning-professional-at-age-45, needs).

Capiche? Alrighty. On with the show!

Read moreGarmin Edge 1030 vs Edge 830: A Comparison (Which Is Right For You?)

Specialized vs Trek Road Bike: Mont’s Comparison Guide

So you’re interested in comparing the road bike ranges of Trek and Specialized, huh?

Well, you’ve come to the right… oh wait, you’re not?

No matter. I’m going to write about it anyway.

I’m interested and that’s all that matters (and you may find it useful, entertaining, a useful sleep aid). Onward!

Read moreSpecialized vs Trek Road Bike: Mont’s Comparison Guide

Bryton Rider 450 Review: Best Value Cycling GPS?

Bryton Rider 450 review

Boom. New bike computer review time. In this case, the Bryton Rider 450.

So far on my bike GPS usage journey (yes, there is such a thing), I’ve had two Garmin Edges (the 510 and 520) and a Wahoo (the ELEMNT Bolt). Now it’s time to see how a new manufacturer and a new 3-digit model number will compare.

The Bryton Rider 450 is a fully-fledged bike GPS device. It uses the magic (science) of satellites to track and record your rides, taking feeds from other sensors secreted about your bike (cadence, power) or your person (heart rate strap).

Once your ride is completed, it sends the data file to the Bryton Active smartphone app and, if you’re that way inclined, on to Strava.

You can also use the device to upload and follow routes, in an attempt not to get lost on twisty turny unknowny roads.

So, very much a bike GPS computer in the Garmin Edge/Wahoo ELEMNT mould. But how does it compare? Most importantly, should you buy one? Read on MacDuff…

Read moreBryton Rider 450 Review: Best Value Cycling GPS?

Aftershokz Trekz Air Bone Conduction Headphones Review: Safest Headphones For Cycling?

Aftershokz Trekz Air review

I am one of those terrible people that wears headphones whilst I’m cycling along.

Before you throw me on the heap as a negligent husband and father, and a liability on the road, hear me out.

I have a pair of wireless Bluetooth headphones. I ride with only one earpiece in, so I’m aware of my surroundings and can hear traffic approaching over my right shoulder.

It’s not an ideal solution though. Whilst I attempt to keep the wires in place by wendling them through the straps on my helmet, the dangling earpiece has a habit of gradually slipping down and pulling the wire tight around my neck.

And one ear of sound is not ideal, whether listening to the podcast (I tend to listen to people talking rather than singing) or listening out for other road users.

The solution, a set of headphones that don’t go in your ears, leaving your lugholes free to sense the white van rapidly approaching your rear end.

Enter the Aftershokz Trekz Air wireless bone conduction headphones (so many ‘kz’, so few ‘c’s).

I’ve been meaning to get a set of Aftershokz for ages. But like most things that involve spending some money, I conveniently forgot to take any action. Finally I thought I’d buy a pair and review them for this ‘ere blog(kz).

Read moreAftershokz Trekz Air Bone Conduction Headphones Review: Safest Headphones For Cycling?

Campagnolo Zonda C17 Wheelset Review: My Quest For A New Pair Of Road Bike Wheels

Trek Domane with Campagnolo Zonda C17 wheelset

I have a habit of using things until well after they’ve stopped working properly.

Partly this is my profound Yorkshireness (deep pockets/short arms), partly inertia. Unless something gets really annoying, I’m unlikely to do anything about it.

Early in 2018 (yes, this is a long term review!) my rear wheel got so annoying I finally decided to do something about it.

I needed to buy myself some new road bike wheels.

Cue the intro music.

Read moreCampagnolo Zonda C17 Wheelset Review: My Quest For A New Pair Of Road Bike Wheels

How To Measure Power On An Indoor Trainer

Elite Crono Fluid trainer on patio

Everyone seems obsessed about power these days.

Chris Froome spends all his time looking down at the power figure on his bike computer (on his stem) so that he can measure out his effort over a ludicrous long distance time trial that results in him winning the Giro d’Italia.

Sticking with Team Sky, power meters are accused of being the main tool by which the Sky Train supposedly sucks the excitement out of life on every Alpine Tour climb*.

(* No I don’t believe that is the case).

Back in the (very much) amateur cycling world, I succumbed to the promise that having a power meter (I’ve got a ‘left only’ Stages crank-mounted one) would instantly transform my training approach and fire my fitness levels into the stratosphere (spoiler alert: it turns out you still have to do the work…).

The good thing about training indoors, if you’re interested in measuring power, is that there are many more options versus measuring power on an outdoors ride. And not all of them involve departing with vast amounts of moolah.

Let’s get into them.

Read moreHow To Measure Power On An Indoor Trainer

The (Bike) Tools That I Use Most: 6 ‘Must Have’ Implements

6-bike-tools-for-road-cycling

Gweetings. In this post I’m going to talk about the bike tools I use the most on my magical cycling adventures. Or ‘bike maintenance’, as normal people might call it.

No particular science was applied (plus ça change). I took a mental canter through my memory banks and tried to think about the implements I’d had most cause to use in recent years.

Then I wrote them down. Hopefully this will prove useful if you’re starting your own cycling tool collection, or wondering what all the cool grease gurus are tinkering with.

Or something. On with the show!

Read moreThe (Bike) Tools That I Use Most: 6 ‘Must Have’ Implements

Into The Light: CatEye Volt 800 and Lezyne KTV Pro Drive Rear 75 Review

Road bike with front and rear lights

The biggest (first world) problem in my life is finding time to do the things I say I want to do.

I’m not unusual – we’ve all got demands on our time. Work stuff. Partner stuff. Kids stuff. Houses stuff.

All that stuff tends to crowd out my time to get out on the bike.

No more is this felt than during the winter months.

Work always seems to be busier. The hours available to ride are fewer and there’s more likelihood that the hours that are available are marred by inclement (at best) or thoroughly miserable weather.

Read moreInto The Light: CatEye Volt 800 and Lezyne KTV Pro Drive Rear 75 Review